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Restaining with same stain but looks like mildew present - help

I am restaining a log home with Wolman Durastain, Semitransparent stain (same stain as on walls now).  I know it's not the best stain but it's what's on the house now and I'd like to avoid a complete change.

I power washed the walls and let dry for a few days.  It appears there is mildew on logs in several places (this mildew may have appeared during drying (?)).  The mildew can be brushed off with rag in places.  

The Durastain is supposed to be mildew resistant.  Do I need to remove this before restraining? If so what would I use on mildew?  Finally is there a good additive you can add to paint to protect against mildew?

The attached picture show the mildew.  

Thanks, Pops.

Tags: mildew, restaining

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Yes, remove the mildew before staining. The stain itself may be mildew resistant, but only once dry and only on the surface. It won't kill existing mildew growth as you apply it. Trapping it underneath will look ugly and could lead to premature failure of your stain.

A sodium percarbonate (oxygenated bleach) cleaner will be the most gentle and clean perfectly well. Apply according to directions & rinse off, then allow to dry. We make a sodium percarb cleaner called CPR, but you can also find them at paint stores & general hardware stores. I'd stay away from bleach, if you can. It will work fine, but is more damaging if not totally diluted and rinsed off.

As far as additives go, there are several on the market. I'd take a trip to your local paint store. They'll have some options. The ones we like best are called Stay Clean I/E and M-1, but there are others that will do the job just fine.

Hope that answers it for now.

-- Charis w/ Sashco - www.sashco.com - cbabcock@sashco.com

Hello folks, Every time I hear of someone power washing a log home my first question is what did you use with the power washer to clean the logs. You need to contact experts at LogFinish.com. I have been in the log home business over thirty years and I wouldn't consider restoring a wooden structure without consulting them. Too many folks use the wrong products to preserve their homes because they don't really know about wood and they end up disappointed with the results. The products that these folks sell are the latest technology and may seem expensive but, it is our dream home. I have had to correct work that others did incorrectly and believe me it ain't cheap. Good Luck, Jim Harbin Katahdin Cedar Log Homes

Hello again, I just saw ChrisB's comment on treatment of the exterior of log homes and I must say that I avoid using products that you buy at paint and hardware outlets. The investment for the home of your dreams deserves the best products to protect it. The log home preservative industry has developed the best products to protect your logs and wooden buildings. Half of my log home business is preservation and restoration of historic and old log structures. There is no such thing as a cheap way to protect your investment. Talk to experts and pay a little more and achieve the best results and in the long run you will find that it is not more expensive to do it right. Good Luck, Jim Harbin Katahdin Cedar Log Homes

In defense of Charis, she was just talking about additives like Stay Clean I/E and M-1 which are sold by many log home product specific manufacturers but are also sold in large retail outlets and paint stores. I can account for Stay Clean, we've been selling it for years and it works very well.

- Kevin, Perma-Chink Systems

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